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86. Review of an Oasis article about Pope Shenouda, the man who was practically a whole Synod on his own

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Article title: 
86. Review of an Oasis article about Pope Shenouda, the man who was practically a whole Synod on his own
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Year: 
2012
Week: 
12
Article number: 
86
Date of source: 
March 23, 2012
Author: 
Cornelis Hulsman
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Martino Diez and Meriem Senous published on March 22 an interesting interview with Father Rafīq Greish, head of the Press Office of the Coptic Catholic Church in Egypt. We are providing here some excerpts with comments showing disagreement on a few points.

 

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What has been the reaction of the civil authorities and of the Muslim institutions?

On Egyptian television the death of Pope Shenouda III was presented as the main news item. The satellite channels, including the non-Christian ones, placed the photo of the Pope in the background and continually showed different images of the chapel of rest and of the people waiting to spend a few moments with his body. All the speakers and journalists wore black jackets or black ties as a sign of mourning. The military authorities, represented by the chief of the army, granted special permission for the transfer of the body to the Convent of St Bishoy where the Pope will be buried – placing a helicopter at the disposal of the Coptic Church. General Tantawi delivered a eulogy of the Pope and offered his condolences to the Christians. The Shaykh of al-Azhar declared that it represented a great loss for the whole Egyptian people.

CH: It I thus extremely disturbing and distorting if organizations would highlight only radical voices as MEMRI has done.

How do you personally assess his stature?
He had a very charismatic personality, he was a fine-looking man. As I have said, he took great pains to improve the level of the Coptic community and especially in the field of education through Sunday schools. He strongly emphasised the fact that the Church must provide charitable services. He built a great number of convents, not only in Egypt but also in America and Germany.

Everyone – supporters and detractors alike – acknowledges the greatness of his achievement. His powerful personality compelled the respect of one and all, Christian and Muslim, and he was often invited to appear on television, especially at times of conflict between the communities, when he frequently played the role of pacifier and mediator.

How will the choice of his successor be made?
Two days after the official funeral the succession procedure will be commenced. It is a rather complicated one: the Egyptian Copts, like all the Eastern Churches including the Catholic Church, hold a synod of bishops tasked with electing a Patriarch. The bishops who have an eparchy (diocese) can vote but they cannot be elected. On the other hand, bishops who do not have eparchies (those having the oversight of a monastery) can be elected, as can priests or monks. For example, the predecessor of Shenouda III, Pope Cyril VI, had been a simple monk.


To begin with, there will be a meeting of the Synod with a committee made up of laypersons, Christian clerics, and individuals from among the Coptic intelligentsia. They will begin to collect ideas and suggest candidates. Following this they will proceed to elections. Finally, the three candidates who have obtained the largest number of votes will gather to celebrate mass together, and in the course of it a child will choose one out of three tickets bearing their names, and that one will be proclaimed Patriarch of Alexandria. Thus the choice made by the child will have expressed “the will of God”.

Does the loss of Pope Shenouda mean even more pain for a Coptic Church that is already extremely stressed?

The Coptic Church is living through what must surely be a historic turning point. It is a moment of great disorder and uncertainty on account of the general situation in which Egypt finds herself and the particular situation of the Christian community. The loss of such a charismatic figure makes everything even more dramatic.

The next pope will bear a great responsibility. Shenouda III’s powerful personality and formidable presence enabled him to appoint the members of the Synod himself, but the future Pope will be called to work collegially with all the representatives of the community, both clerical and lay.

What is the role of the Egyptian civil authorities in the election of the Pope?

Once the new Pope is elected, the President of the Republic issues a decree confirming the nomination of the Coptic Pope. For this reason it is hoped that the election of the successor to Shenouda III will be completed before the presidential election, so as to allow the greatest freedom in the choice.

Can you give us a general overview of the present position of the Copts?

The greatest aspiration of the Coptic community, which is made up of ten million or so Egyptians, has always been to acquire full citizenship rights and to prevent its members from being considered second-class citizens. There are still far too many discriminatory laws that have never been abolished despite many promises. For example, the Copts have been waiting 32 years for laws that would permit them to build churches.

With the loss of Shenouda III they feel deprived of the representation they had with the government, for it was he who dialogued with the military and civil authorities. Moreover, with the rise of political Islam, the need to have a strong Pope will become all the more pressing. But at the same time it will be necessary for the new pope to take up positions that are more emollient than intransigent.

CH: The number of ten million is highly inflated and father Rafīq Greish knows this. He knows of the work of Dr. Philippe Fargues and other scholars. The number of Christians in Egypt is more likely to be around 6 percent or around five million. He is probably using the inflated figure to please Coptic bishops who generally hold to the inflated number for political reasons, that is trying to strengthen the position of Christians in Egypt. While this effort is correct, it is incorrect to use inflated figures that no one can check for this purpose. It is not true there are no laws on church building but it is true that there is no equality in building opportunities between mosques and churches which is in turn related to the way this and other laws in Egypt are executed.

 

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