39. Widespread Nostalgia for the Pre-Nasser Era – a Book Review of “Inside Egypt: the Land of the Pharaohs on the Brink of a Revolution” by John R. Bradley

John R. Bradley, a British author and journalist best known for his 2008 book Inside Egypt: the Land of the Pharaohs on the Brink of a Revolution, identifies the Egyptian revolution of 1952 as “a failed revolution” that ended Egypt’s belle époque of the 1930s and 1940s’ cultural heyday. The author describes pre-Nasser Egypt as a historically tolerant country where heterogeneity and diversity were the respected norm. Egypt’s liberal intellectuals and Coptic Christians nostalgically tap into the glorious pre-Nasser era as a safe haven for its religious and political dissidents. That being said, the author is critical of ongoing marginalization of Coptic Christians.

 

17. Engagement, not Fear Needed with Egyptian President Mursī

Muhammad Mursī was declared president Sunday after several days of uncertainty that resulted from a presidential election that exposed deep polarization in Egyptian society - those who favor an Islamist civilian president and oppose a member of the Mubarak regime were pitted against those who fear Islamists but were willing to vote for a member of the old order.

14. Peace Journalism

In December 2009 I met with Paul Duffill, the 2008 recipient of the Isaac Roet Prize, at the conference: "Understanding Peace, Conflict and Violence" held at Institute for Social Studies, the Hague. Paul received his prize for his essay: "A Meta-Intervention for the Israel-Palestine Conflict Incorporating Economic and Social Justice Issues". His can be downloaded from (here "Paul Duffill"): We both share an interest in the intersection between media and peace.

47. The Muslim Brotherhood’s Organizational Structure: Any Christian Similarity?

Today the court postponed ruling on a case calling for the dissolution of the Muslim Brotherhood as an entity. It will be reviewed again on September 4, at which point the group may be declared illegal and forced to disband.

The following is an effort to understand the structure of the Muslim Brotherhood, as well as an effort to compare it to a more familiar Western expression of religion: The small group Bible study. Too often the Brotherhood is only seen from its top administrative levels, which fill the headlines of newspapers and command cries of conspiracy and caliphate. It is hoped a greater understanding of its organizational reach can provide perspective about the group as a whole, through which the current legal questions are being asked.

60. The Goal of the Muslim Brotherhood

The Muslim Brotherhood is a difficult subject to tackle. Some of this is the fault of others – there appears to be significant bias against them in many quarters. Some of this is their own fault – they are a closed organization accountable to no government oversight.

 

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Al-Misrī al-Yawm published on July 15, 2012 an article entitled "Netherlands agree to grant political asylum to Egypt's Copts". In the article the Dutch Coptic Association was quoted saying "The Netherlands officially approved the Association's request to grant political asylum to Egypt's Copts, after submitting evidence." The Association quoted the Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations (BZK) as saying that the agreement was based on the decision of the Dutch Parliament.  

Al-Misrī al-Yawm added that Dr. Bahā' Ramzī, head of the Dutch Coptic Association, stated "Based on the report of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs on June 2012 and the situation of Christians in Egypt, it was agreed to grant asylum to Egyptian Christians in Holland." ['Imād Khalīl, al-Misrī al-Yawm, July 15, 2012] Read original text in Arabic

This is a comment on an article with similar title published today on a blog called “Salamamoussa. Reclaiming Egypt,” named after Salāmah Mūsá (1887-1958), a well-known journalist, writer, and advocate of secularism and Arab socialism who was born into a wealthy, land-owning Coptic family in the town of Al-Zaqāzīq located in the Nile Delta. I earlier commented on previous articles of Salamamoussa that were also related to migration:

The Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) presented two opposing opinions from editors of large London-based dailies, Tāriq Al-Humayid, editor of the Saudi Al-Sharq Al-Awsat, opposed to Muhammad Mursī, and 'Abd Al-Barī ‘Atwān, editor of Al-Quds Al-'Arabī, rejoicing over Mursī’s narrow victory. Atwan, MEMRI writes, is a harsh critic of Saudi Arabia. Both newspapers published their articles on June 25, 2012.

 

What is written about Christian citizens in Egypt is not subject in any case to the logic of journalistic treatment as it is subject in many cases to the logic of intimidation and exaggeration or underestimation and stultification.

Arab-West Report advocates accurate reporting about Islam and the different streams that exist among Muslims, including Salafīs who indeed often have been misrepresented in various media. On the other hand Arab-West Report expects that Muslim authors and leaders present an accurate picture of Christians and various Christian institutions such as the Vatican. This was unfortunately not the case with an article in the Egyptian newspaper, Al-Fath, founded by Salafi Shaykh, Muhammad Hasān, which appeared on 15 June 2012 (page 3): “The Vatican Calls for Recognizing Christians in Arab Constitutions and Christianization in Nigeria”.

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Newsclippings from International Sources

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Since the middle of the twentieth century, the Middle East has seen regional hegemons come and go. The 1950s and 1960s were Egypt’s era: Cairo was the Arab World’s capital and the home of its charismatic postcolonial leader, Gamal Abdel Nasser. But Israel’s victory over Egypt, Jordan, and Syria in the 1967 war; Nasser’s death, in 1970; and the spike in oil prices after the 1973 war brought that era to an end. As millions of Egyptians and other Arabs left home for the oil-wealthy Gulf, the gravity of Arab politics went with them. As the Gulf’s fortunes rose, especially in Saudi Arabia, so too did Riyadh’s political clout. Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990, however, and the subsequent U.S.-led war, which was launched from Saudi soil, made clear that oil could buy Gulf countries, including Saudi Arabia, a lot of influence, but they still needed American protection.
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n the morning of May 15, Egyptians abroad started voting in the presidential elections at Egyptian embassies and consulates around the world. International voting stations are open for four days after which voting will take place in Egypt on May 26-27. Preliminary data from the Egyptian Foreign Ministry showed extensive participation in the voting at the embassies around the world, but a report released on May 16 said that, as of 2 p.m. that day, 100,000 persons had voted. This is a small number considering that 8 million Egyptians live abroad, but it is a reasonable figure considering that 305,000 expatriates voted in the first round of the 2012 presidential elections. It should be noted that the Higher Election Committee has decided not to allow voting by mail. 
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ews on the Palestinian reconciliation front has taken a positive turn. The first practical steps will feature the creation of a technocratic government responsible for civil affairs in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. This development promises to open a new chapter not only in Palestinian governance but also on the diplomatic playing field between Israel and a revitalized Palestinian Authority (PA).
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News on the Palestinian reconciliation front has taken a positive turn. The first practical steps will feature the creation of a technocratic government responsible for civil affairs in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. This development promises to open a new chapter not only in Palestinian governance but also on the diplomatic playing field between Israel and a revitalized Palestinian Authority (PA).
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Ehab El-Kharrat, a leading Coptic figure of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, is supporting Hamdeen Sabahi for president, and explaining why

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